Blower Buying and Operating Tips TT83
Published on May 8, 2014

Electricity cost should be a major concern when motors operate continuously. Don't get fooled by low horsepower ratings on electric equipment. Always compare work being done to power consumed in watts.

 

Blower Buying and Operating Tips - Tech Talk 83

Compare blowers not by horsepower ratings but by watts. That's what you pay for!

Electricity cost should be a major concern when motors operate continuously. Don't get fooled by low horsepower ratings on electric equipment. Always compare work being done to power consumed in watts.

For instance, you may have seen air blowers and water pumps advertised with lower horsepower ratings than other equipment of the same size. The gimmick is to use an undersized, low-cost, high service factor motor to imply superior performance. But this smaller motor has to work harder to do the job. The small motor may get through a temporary overload condition, but is not reliable for continuous duty. It will actually use more electricity, operate at a higher temperature and have a shorter life than a larger 1.0 service factor motor doing the same work.

Sweetwater® blowers run cooler because they use the correct 1.0 service factor motor for the continuous duty work being done.

Here are some blower operating tips:

  • Bleed off as much excess air as you can while you still have as much air as you need. The blower will run cooler and use less power.
  • If the ambient air is so dirty (feed dust, bird feathers, etc.) that the air filter requires frequent cleaning, pull a sock over the filter. Then change your socks frequently!
  • After three years of continuous operation in critical animal life support applications, purchase a new blower and have the original blower's motor bearings replaced. Operate the original unit for a month to be sure the work was done correctly, then switch back to the new blower, keeping the original one as a backup.

You can't measure watts without a watt meter - BUT you can estimate watt consumption with these formulas:

  • Single phase watts = volts x amps x power factor.
  • Three phase watts = volts x amps x 1.73 x power factor.

The power factor of a fully loaded electric motor is about .9, but this goes down significantly as the load on the motor is reduced.